Nationality and Borders Bill

Nationality and Borders Bill

News item 15 March 2022:

We've written a new briefing about the government's Nationality and Borders Bill

Summary of the briefing:

  • The UK government is seeking to reform the asylum system and tackle illegal entry into the UK as well as speed up removals of those who don’t have a legal right to remain in the UK.
  • The government has published the Nationality and Borders Bill and this Bill must go through the necessary parliamentary process required to become primary legislation. The government is hoping to complete this process in early 2022.
  • The Bill proposes radical changes to the UK asylum system such as providing differential treatment based on how someone comes to the UK, the introduction of asylum reception centres and offshore processing sites for asylum claims.
  • The Bill proposes radical changes to the UK asylum system such as providing differential treatment based on how someone comes to the UK, the introduction of asylum reception centres and offshore processing sites for asylum claims.
  • The Bill also seeks to increase sentences for smugglers and for illegal entry, fast-track appeals and removals, as well as provide reforms to the age assessment process for unaccompanied asylum-seeking children and the threshold for establishing who is a potential victim of modern slavery or how much support is available to victims of modern slavery.
  • A number of new amendments have been tabled by the government and the House of Lords since its original publication. These include amendments impacting the registration and revocation of British Citizenship and the age-assessment process for people seeking leave to remain or enter.
  • Key concerns over the Bill include the failure to address the decision-making backlog on asylum claims, that providing differential treatment to refugees undermines international obligations and that reception centres and temporary status will not facilitate integration. Many young asylum seekers could be incorrectly treated as adults and that fewer survivors of modern slavery could perhaps be able to access state protection. Other concerns include that the Bill could cause some children to become stateless and that people from some communities are more likely to be negatively impacted by reforms around citizenship.

This follow-up briefing aims to explain the subsequent developments and progress the Bill has made and focuses on elements that impact integration. 

 

 

 

Page last updated:17/03/2022 12:46:04

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